Domestic worker visas - | Hudson McKenzie

Domestic worker visas

April 1, 2021 | Immigration, UK Government

A domestic worker can apply to visit the UK with their employer where they have worked with the employer for at least a year. This can include cleaners, chauffeurs, cooks, nannies and those providing personal care to the employer. This visa is meant for those who will be working whilst their employer is in the UK. The employer should be either British, who usually lives outside of the UK, or a foreign national who is visiting the UK. The visa can be granted for up to 6 months.  

How do you prove you are a domestic worker?

The employment requirement can be met by providing certain evidence such as:

  • Payslips
  • Bank statements showing salary
  • Contract of employment
  • Confirmation of tax paid

The Home Office must be satisfied that the domestic worker will be working to support the employer and/or their family during their stay in the UK. During your stay in the UK, your employer must pay you an amount which must be at least national minimum wage for the UK. The minimum wage changes, therefore it is important that this is checked before applying, however, at present, the current minimum wage is £8.72 per hour for over 25 year olds. 

Settlement as a domestic worker

For those domestic workers who applied before 5 April 2012, you may be able to apply to settle permanently in the UK after 5 years providing you meet certain requirements. For those applying for the domestic worker visa after 5 April 2012, you can only apply to extend your visa if your current visa is for less than 6 months. Therefore, you can be in the UK for a maximum of 6 months and cannot apply for settlement under this route.

Should you have any queries regarding the above information or if you require assistance with your corporate, employment or immigration matter, please get in touch with a legal professional at Hudson McKenzie via email at londoninfo@hudsonmckenzie.com or by telephone +44(0) 20 3318 5794.

The information provided does not amount to legal advice.